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Safety in Football Campaign

All across the state of Oklahoma, athletic trainers are providing their clinical skill and expertise each and every day to improve the overall health and safety of their athletes.  According to a study conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the presence of athletic trainers in the secondary schools lowers overall injury rates, improves diagnosis and return‐to‐play decisions, and reduces the risk for recurrent injuries.  In other words, Safety in Athletics begins with having an Athletic Trainer.

“Athletic Trainers have a skill set that is very valuable, especially now when there is such a focus on concussions and related treatment and care.  Concussed athletes are more likely to be identified in schools with athletic trainers and thus more likely to receive proper treatment.” Cynthia LaBella, MD, FAAP; Lead Author, 2012 American Academy of Pediatrics Study.

At Your Own Risk

A safer approach to work, life and sport. The National Athletic Trainers’ Association strives to advocate for athletic trainers by influencing public opinion and policy.  NATA has developed a public awareness campaign, At Your Own Risk, aimed specifically at educating parents, student athletes, school administrators, legislators and employers on the athletic trainers’ role as an expert in prevention and safety. Learn more about how you can support this initiative at your local, state and district levels.” (National Athletic Trainers’ Association)

http://www.atyourownrisk.org/

Complete Your Sport Risk Assessment

Are you a parent, athlete, coach, administrator or legislator? If so, please visit http://www.atyourownrisk.org/reduce-your-risk/ to see how you can help to reduce the risk of injury.

Emergency Action Plans

“Proper emergency management of limb- or life-threatening injuries is critical and should be handled by trained medical and allied health personnel. Preparation for response to emergencies includes education and training, maintenance of emergency equipment and supplies, appropriate use of personnel, and the formation and implementation of an emergency plan. The emergency plan should be thought of as a blueprint for handling emergencies. A sound emergency plan is easily understood and establishes accountability for the management of emergencies. Furthermore, failure to have an emergency plan can be considered negligence.” (NATA Position Statement)

For more information on how to create an Emergency Action Plan, please visit: https://www.nata.org/sites/default/files/white-paper-emergency-action-plan.pdf

Concussions

“A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury—or TBI—caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. This sudden movement can cause the brain to bounce around or twist in the skull, stretching and damaging the brain cells and creating chemical changes in the brain. Medical providers may describe a concussion as a “mild” brain injury because concussions are usually not life-threatening. Even so, the effects of a concussion can be serious.” (CDC HEADs Up Website)

Concussion 101 – NATA

Concussion Signs and Symptoms – CDC

Concussion Danger Signs – CDC

Returning to Sports and Activities – CDC

Returning to School – CDC

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

“Sudden cardiac arrest occurs suddenly and often without warning. It is triggered by an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia). With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Seconds later, a person loses consciousness and has no pulse. Death occurs within minutes if the victim does not receive treatment.” (American Heart Association)

“Student-athletes are viewed as some of the healthiest members of society, so sudden cardiac deaths are always shocking. Various causes of these incidents can occur in one of every 40,000 student-athletes per year. And though many athletes with heart conditions can live a normal life and not experience health-related problems, sudden fatality from a heart condition is the leading medical cause of death in NCAA athletes, responsible for 75 percent of all sudden deaths that occur during exercise, training or competition. But by providing training to coaches and team medical staff, and reporting signs and symptoms, we can provide all athletes with a healthy and exciting sports career.” (National Collegiate Athletics Association)

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) – Korey Stringer Institute

Sudden Cardiac Arrest – Infographic – NATA

Heat Related Illness

“Heat illnesses are a spectrum of illnesses that occur due to heat exposure. This heat exposure can come from either environmental heat (air temperature) or simply intense exercise. These conditions can range from minor heat cramps to life-threatening heat stroke.  Contrary to popular belief, heat illnesses do not exist on a continuum. You do not need to have heat cramps or syncope before you have heat exhaustion. As with all emergency conditions, there are steps that you can take to prevent heat illnesses, such as proper hydration, heat acclimatization or body cooling.   The key determinant for good prognosis following a heat illness is rapid recognition and treatment. In the case of exertional heat stroke, delay in treatment nearly always leads to long term complications or death.” (Korey Stringer Institute)

“According to the CDC, heat illness during practice or competition is the leading cause of death among U.S. high school athletes.” (National Athletic Trainers’ Association)

Beat the Heat – NATA

Parents and Coaches Guide to Heat Illness – NATA

Preventing Heat Related Illnesses – Gatorade Sport Science Institute

Lightning

“According to the CDC, lightning strikes Earth more than 8 million times per day. NOAA reports that from 2004-2013, 33 people were killed and 234 injured due to lightning.

The NOAA reports that on average, lightning strikes are fatal to about 10% of people who are struck, while the remain 90% survive but with long-term, often debilitating symptoms.” (National Athletic Trainers’ Association)

““If thunder roars – GO INDOORS!”  Everyone should be in safe zones BEFORE lightning reaches the playing field.” (Korey Stringer Institute)

Lightning Safety – KSI

2015 Lightning Deaths – The Weather Channel

Lightning Do’s and Don’ts – NATA

Sickle Cell

“It’s a generally benign condition in which a person inherits from their parents one gene for the oxygen-carrying element in their red blood cells – hemoglobin – and one gene for sickle shaped hemoglobin. It is not the same as the more severe condition, sickle cell disease, in which both genes for sickle hemoglobin are inherited. Those with the trait experience normal healthy lives. Only in situations where the body is pushed to extreme conditions, as athletes do, can the trait sometimes cause red blood cells to sickle and block blood vessels, denying oxygen to muscles and organs. But in most cases, carriers of the trait live normal, healthy lives without incident.” (National Collegiate Athletics Association)

 

“Acute Rhabdomyolysis, tied to the sickle cell trait, has been reviewed as one of the top four killers in secondary school high school and college student athletes.

In 2002, the NATA Task Force for Sickle Cell Trait Awareness determined that over the past four decades, exertional sickling has killed at least 15 football players. In the past seven years prior to publishing, it was reported that exertional sickling was the cause of nine student athlete deaths. Of the 136 total sudden, non-traumatic sports deaths in high school and collegiate sports over a decade, 5% were from exertional sickling.” (National Athletic Trainers’ Association)

Sickle Cell Trait Fact Sheet for Student Athletes – NCAA

Sickle Cell Trait Fact Sheet for Coaches – NCAA

Asthma

“Asthma is a chronic disease involving the airways in the lungs. These airways, or bronchial tubes, allow air to come in and out of the lungs.

If you have asthma your airways are always inflamed. They become even more swollen and the muscles around the airways can tighten when something triggers your symptoms. This makes it difficult for air to move in and out of the lungs, causing symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath and/or chest tightness.

For many asthma sufferers, timing of these symptoms is closely related to physical activity. And, some otherwise healthy people can develop asthma symptoms only when exercising. This is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), or exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Staying active is an important way to stay healthy, so asthma shouldn’t keep you on the sidelines. Your physician can develop a management plan to keep your symptoms under control before, during and after physical activity.

People with a family history of allergies or asthma are more prone to developing asthma. Many people with asthma also have allergies. This is called allergic asthma.” (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology)

Asthma Fast Facts for Kids – CDC

Asthma Facts – CDC

Asthma vs Vocal Cord Dysfunction or Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction – NATA

Mental Health

“Health means both physical and mental health: they are two sides of the same coin, with one often affecting the other. Physical problems, including sport injury, often have psychological or emotional consequences. Psychological problems, which can include eating disorders and substance-use problems, typically have physical consequences. As with physical injuries, mental health problems may affect athletic performance and limit, or even preclude, training and competition until successfully managed and treated.” (National Collegiate Athletics Association)

Understanding Athlete Burnout and Mental Health – NATA

The Female Athlete Triad – ACSM

 ADHD and the Student Athlete – NCAA

National Suicide Prevention Flyer

Disordered Eating and Eating Disorders – NCAA

At Your Own Risk

“A safer approach to work, life and sport.

The National Athletic Trainers’ Association strives to advocate for athletic trainers by influencing public opinion and policy.  NATA has developed a public awareness campaign, At Your Own Risk, aimed specifically at educating parents, student athletes, school administrators, legislators and employers on the athletic trainers’ role as an expert in prevention and safety. Learn more about how you can support this initiative at your local, state and district levels.” (National Athletic Trainers’ Association)

http://www.atyourownrisk.org/

Football Safety

https://usafootball.com/health-safety/checklists

Helmet Safety

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/helmets/index.html

Copyright © 2014 Oklahoma Athletic Trainers' Association